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» GUEST RUNDOWNS » THE PLANNING INSTITUTE OF JAMAICA SAYS FEWER JAMAICANS ARE BEING DEPORTED FROM ABROAD!

THE PLANNING INSTITUTE OF JAMAICA SAYS FEWER JAMAICANS ARE BEING DEPORTED FROM ABROAD!

 

By Alicia Dunkley——

THE decline in the number of Jamaicans being deported from abroad has continued the Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) is reporting.

In the 2011 Economic and Social Survey for Jamaica published by the PIOJ, which was tabled in Parliament on Thursday, the numbers have dropped from 2,825 in 2010, to 2,629 in 2011.

The report said deportees returned for convictions were mostly in the ‘overstay’, ‘illegal entry or re-entry’ categories, and possession of drugs — 40.9 per cent and 31.8 per cent respectively.

“There was a marked gender difference in deportees with 83.3 per cent being male,” the PIOJ said in its report.

In the meantime, it said while there was a decline overall in deportees to Jamaica, there were increases in deportees from the United States and Canada, 0.6 and 19.6 per cent respectively. Declines were also observed for the United Kingdom 31.2 per cent and other countries 12.1 per cent. Based on the statistics some 1,379 Jamaicans were deported from the United States in 2011 as against 1,371 in 2010, while some 226 Jamaicans were deported from Canada in 2011 as against 189 the year before. Some 458 Jamaicans were deported from the UK in 2010 as against 315 in 2011.

Meanwhile, the PIOJ says there was a 9.0 per cent decline in the number of Jamaicans granted visas for permanent residence in the United States — from 21,783 in 2009 to 19,825 in 2010. It said estimates for 2011 indicate that 24,359 Jamaicans were granted visas for permanent residence in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.

In relation to the United States it said the figures include Jamaicans who received their visas in Jamaica, those already living in the States, and those living elsewhere.

According to the PIOJ, Jamaica was ranked 14th among countries with the highest number of residents granted legal permanent residence status for the United States, a shift relative to 11th place in 2009.

According to the report, Jamaicans accounted for 1.8 per cent of all persons granted permanent legal status for 2010. Approximately 53.3 per cent of emigrants were classified as new arrivals while the remaining proportion had an adjustment in their status.

Data available on the marital status of emigrants indicate 50.2 per cent as married. The PIOJ said females accounted for 55.5 per cent of all migrants to the USA and outnumbered males in all age groups.

Like previous years, family reunification continued to be the main reason for emigration to the United States, accounting for 96.7 per cent of the total emigrants. Emigrants to the USA are admitted based on seven categories of admissions.

According to the Institute, Canada accounted for 1,485 permanent residents from Jamaica. It said between 2004 and 2010 there were fluctuations in the number of Jamaicans granted British citizenship. However, there was a decline of 6.0 per cent from 3,148 in 2009 to 2,958 in 2010.

And the number of returning residents has also declined with that figure now at 1,068, a 5.8 per cent decline relative to 2010 when 1,134 persons returned. According to the PIOJ the majority of returning residents, 522, or 51.7 per cent came from the United States, while 208 or 19.5 per cent came from the United Kingdom. It said there were declines in the number of returning residents from all countries except Canada.

 

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