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DESPITE DATE CHANGE – “A ST MARY MI COME FROM” STILL HITS THE SPOT!

August 22, 2012
By

Capleton

By Cabbrina Lennox—-

Charity with a difference, the annual charitable event, A St Mary Mi Come From, held under the theme ‘Ole Time Some Ting Come Back Again’, gave the crowd at the Gray’s Inn Sports Complex in Annotto Bay a rare treat.

The show, which is normally held on the day before Independence Day each year, had to be postponed because of inclement weather caused by the passing of Tropical Storm Ernesto.

The show had to go on, however, mainly because proceeds from it go towards improving facilities at schools and the two hospitals in the parish – the Annotto Bay and Port Maria hospitals.

“St Mary Mi Come From is a charity event … where we give back to the community. This year, we want to do some work on the computer lab at the Islington High School,” Capleton told The Gleaner.

Islington is the birth home of Capleton, the artist many know as ‘The Fire Man’ and the man responsible for the annual event.

Ninja Man, who is also a product of St Mary, explained why he has remained loyal to the event.

Ninja Man

PRODUCT OF ST MARY

“Me is a part of this show. Me is a St Mary man. Mi born in a Annotto Bay Hospital, … and Capleton spend the money fi promote the show, mi haffi donate my time. Anywhere inna the world mi deh nuh care how much money dem a pay mi and this show a keep, mi a go cancel that show and come home,” Ninja Man said.

“Every time this show done, something good happen fi the community; school, a clinic or the hospitals. And a whole heap a youths achieve out a this from St Mary and throughout the country, so this a my donation to what Capleton a donate to the country,” he continued.

The artist explained that his career is going well despite spending time in prison for the last three years.

“A three years mi lock weh from society, and mi come out and it come like a foreign me come from. Mi still have the same powers, mi still a look bout the people dem, mi still have the country responsibility – if a man want school fee fi him yute, him still can check mi an mi maintain it – and mi still have mi career on the peak a where it fi deh,” Ninja Man told The Gleaner.

This point was proven when he was invited on stage by The Fire Man himself. He stood poised, in full white – on stage for about two minutes saying nothing, and the crowd just went wild. When the silent soliloquy was over, Ninja Man delivered exactly what was expected of him.

The artist then went on to invite Capleton to battle with him. The two engaged in a friendly clash which brought fire to the stage.

Flags went flying when Sizzla hit the stage. The crowd expected much from him, and he didn’t disappoint.

Sizzla

Sizzla gave the crowd an avalanche of his hits, delivered with immaculate precision. He did a tribute to Marcus Garvey called The Whole World Love Marcus Mosiah, after which he encourage the audience to Change Them Ways.

Macka Diamond wasted no time getting the audience into a frenzy, belting out songs like Think Bout MiCow Foot, and A Deh So Nice, before she was joined by Black-er who was up to his old tricks, encouraging the females to Bun Him and irritating the males.

Richie Spice

Richie Spice, another crowd favourite was well received crying out to beFree because Earth A Run Red as the World is a Cycle.

The reggae crooner also sang Small CornerGrooving My Girl andYouths Dem Cold.

Richie Spice later introduced Spanner Banner, who did Angels Around Me and Old Barrage, to which the crowd responded to well.

HIGH ENTERTAINMENT

Carl Dawkins gave his usual performance singing Land of Make Believe, while pausing to strut his stuff for the ladies.

The crowd didn’t have a chance to flirt with boredom, as entertainers kept the stage occupied all night.

Earlier in the night, artistes from St Mary did a good job of setting the stage for what was to come.

Master drummer Bongo Herman drummed up a storm in a very dramatic set, showing fancy foot moves and pulling out musical tricks.

Poor and Boasy, winner of the 2009 ‘Magnum Kings And Queens Of Dancehall’, gave a very commanding performance, leaving the audience calling for more.

That thirst for more was soon quenched as the audience was treated to hits from Mikey General, Micheal Fabulous, Blacka Don, Nesbeth, Major Mackerel, and others.

Major Mackerel, doing Pretty Looks DoneMi Have More Gal A Roadand Miss Getty Getty, was one of the few artists invited back on stage.

“The show nice. The artistes them come out and support. Some of the artist dem never show up tru the rebook and the postponement tru the weather, but the vibe still went great. The people dem enjoy themselves and dem love it. Them party till day light,” said Capleton.

Cocoa Tea

This was true as the crowd waited to see Coco Tea, who was stuck in traffic. When he arrived after 7 a.m. on Sunday morning, he wasted no time in delivering. He, too, engaged in a friendly clash with Ninja Man and the crowd loved it.

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