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» GUEST RUNDOWNS » VETERAN PRODUCER WINSTON “NINEY” HOLNESS OPENS NEW STUDIO TO – “UNLEASH A NEW SOUND ON THE JAMAICAN MARKETPLACE!”

VETERAN PRODUCER WINSTON “NINEY” HOLNESS OPENS NEW STUDIO TO – “UNLEASH A NEW SOUND ON THE JAMAICAN MARKETPLACE!”

By Balford Henry——

VETERAN producer Winston ‘Niney’ Holness, principal of the Observer Soundbox Studio, said he is going to unleash a new sound in the Jamaican marketplace.

His comments came at the official opening of his Lyndhurst Road-based studio.

Veteran producer Winston ‘Niney’ Holness greets Sharon Ffolkes- Abrahams (right), minister of state in the Ministry of Industry, Investment and Commerce, while Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, Opposition spokesperson on culture, looks on. The occasion was the opening of Holness’s Observer Soundbox Studio on Lyndhurst Road on Tuesday evening. (PHOTO: BRYAN CUMMINGS)

“This music is going to be somewhere between reggae and something else, and it is going to have a new name,” Holness told guests at the launch.

He said he had been experimenting with old rhythms and new acts as well as working with veterans including ‘Blackbeard’ Sinclair, ‘Trinity’ Bramwell and ‘Flabba’ Holt.

Holness said he hopes to get private investments and government support.

“I would like to have a team which can set up a proper record company which can produce good Jamaican music and promote it globally, instead of producing it and selling to an overseas label. It’s going to be a big market thing, if I can get the support, but it needs investment and sacrifice,” said Holness.

Guest speaker Sharon Folkes-Abrahams, minister of state in the ministry of industry, investment and commerce, said her ministry fully supported Holness in his endeavours and welcomed the studio’s opening.

Winston "Niney" Holness

Winston “Niney” Holness

She said Jamaica needs more top quality artistes, music, performers and producers, if it is to remain the reggae capital.

“While Jamaica continues to be regarded worldwide as the home of reggae music, that title is being challenged by other countries today, and one of the reasons for this, unfortunately, is the declining quality and impact of the locally produced reggae music,” she said.

Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange, Opposition spokesperson culture, urged veterans to use their experience to help improve the quality of the productions.

“The pioneers who understand the roots of the music must not just let go and walk away. They must wheel-and-come again and start producing the kinds of tracks that have made our music what it is,” she said.

“I am happy that Niney has set up this studio to take back the music and create an environment for international hits,” she added.

The studio’s opening was attended by several veterans including singer Ken Boothe, who performed, Derrick Harriott; Everton Bird; and Patrick Roberts, principal of Shocking Vibes studio and People’s National Party councillor.

 

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