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» GUEST RUNDOWNS » “ADMIRAL BAILEY WILL BE ABLE TO EXPLAIN IN COURT MARCH 5” SAYS HIS ATTORNEY!

“ADMIRAL BAILEY WILL BE ABLE TO EXPLAIN IN COURT MARCH 5” SAYS HIS ATTORNEY!

 Bailey… scheduled for court March 5—-

KINGSTON, Jamaica —

Tom Tavares-Finson, attorney-at-law for Jamaican deejay Glendon ‘Admiral’ Bailey says his client is a good man and that fraud-related charges brought against him are a misunderstanding.

Speaking with OBSERVER ONLINE Wednesday, Tavares-Finson said, “Admiral Bailey is someone who is highly regarded by many members of society and not as someone who has been associated with any criminality or even the hint of criminality.”

He said instead, his client has made an effort to keep himself out of any difficulty with the law.

Tavares-Finson explained that Bailey is “a sort of crossover artiste between the genre of deejay music and calypso” and so a lot of people were shocked that the news came out that he has been charged for fraud.

The attorney left the impression that the name his client attempted to use, Michael George Sullivan, was one he has been using for a number of years now.

He said: “I indicated that the travel documents that they are alleging are fraudulent are documents that he has been using for over 25 years.”

“I am satisfied that when the matter comes before the court we will be able to offer an explanation…”.

Bailey is scheduled to appear in the Corporate Area Criminal Court on Thursday, March 5 after he was arrested Monday.

According to the police, the deejay went to the Passport Immigration and Citizenship Agency (PICA) about 10:30 am Monday and attempted to renew a passport in the name Micheal George Sullivan.

“During the renewal process, his true identity was revealed. Subsequently, investigators from PICA detained him,” the Jamaica Constabulary Force’s Corporate Communications said in a media release issued Monday.

The police said he was charged with:

* two counts of uttering forged documents;

* two counts of obtaining passport by false pretence;

* two counts of possession of forged documents;

* one count of attempting to obtain a passport by false pretence; and

* one count of conspiracy to defraud.

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