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TRYING TO GET A PERSONAL BEST? STUDY REVEALS RUNNERS SHOULD AVOID REGGAE AND LISTEN TO POP AND HEAVY METAL INSTEAD!

March 13, 2017
By

 RunnerJogger

  • Australian study has shown that pop music and heavy metal are best to run to
  • Pop, heavy metal, opera, classical and reggae were analysed by researchers
  • Operatic music and reggae came out on the bottom if you’re after a new PB
  • Fitness coach, Leanne Hall, said it’s all down to what feelings music elicits
  • She also added that if we listen to music with a slow beat, we run slower 

It’s something many of us do without thinking. We lace up our trainers, plug in our earphones and take to the streets.

But would you change the music you listen to while out running if you knew it could impact your performance?

A new Australian study has revealed that pop music is the best type of music to listen to while running. This is closely followed by heavy metal.

On the other hand, opera and reggae are detrimental to your pursuit of a new personal best.

A recent study found that pop music and heavy metal are good to listen to while running (stock image) - on the other hand, opera and reggae were not advised

'Part of it comes down to personal preference... but really it comes down to the feelings that that kind of music elicits,' fitness coach, Leanne Hall, said (stock image)

‘Part of it comes down to personal preference… but really it comes down to the feelings that that kind of music elicits,’ fitness coach, Leanne Hall, said (stock image)

 ‘It’s really interesting when we looked at different genres and the effect different types of music had on our running,’ psychologist and fitness coach, Leanne Hall, said of the Jaybird experiment.

‘Part of it comes down to personal preference… but really it comes down to the feelings that that kind of music elicits.

‘For example, classical music tends to make us feel really calm – and the research does show that.

‘Pop music is a really, really interesting one.

‘Part of me thinks that that’s because with pop music – particularly the stuff we hear on the radio – we kind of know the words. It gives us something to focus on.’

Electronics company, Jaybird, conducted the experiment with Leanne Hall and Tanya Poppett (pictured) over the course of five days

Electronics company, Jaybird, conducted the experiment with Leanne Hall and Tanya Poppett (pictured) over the course of five days

They tested out heavy metal/rock, classical, reggae, opera and pop on separate days in order to see how they influenced training (pictured)

Electronics company, Jaybird, conducted the experiment with Leanne Hall and fellow fitness coach, Tanya Poppett, over the course of five days.

They tested out heavy metal/rock, classical, reggae, opera and pop on separate days in order to see how they influenced training.

‘I think the beat [of the music] is really important and often, if it matches our cadence, or is close to matching our cadence, that is a really big thing,’ Ms Hall said.

'If we listen to music with a slow beat, we're more likely to run a little slower. Pop music tends to be a little more pacey, as does heavy metal,' Leanne Hall said (stock image)

‘If we listen to music with a slow beat, we’re more likely to run a little slower. Pop music tends to be a little more pacey, as does heavy metal.

‘That type of music probably makes us run a little quicker than reggae or classical.’



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